Tag Archives: scenario

Building Trust with Buyers Chapter 2

*Following based on Chapter 2 Continuing Case in Sell – Building Trust and Sales Ethics

Expertise – ex. offer to train salespeople on a system designed to work with the client’s business. They can offer to work with managers and financial officers to develop the proper training program.

Dependability – ex. They can devote a certain portion of training to understanding and pursuing the goals of the company.

Candor – ex. Let him know that the old relationship is over if they would be willing to start with a new salesperson.

Custom Orientation – ex. They could do research on the needs of the company and propose ways to solve those problems. Brenda can find out what problems might occur along the market chain which affects the use of the product, whether it is delivery time or application and training on the product. Follow-up service could include a number of hours of training on the use of the product.
What should Brenda do? Brenda should make herself accessible to the client in order to understand fully their needs. Brenda needs to make her goals compatible with those of the client in terms of performance, service and return on investment. She should plan on offering promotions that fit the buyer’s needs. These planned promotions could be a way of introducing the product to the client. Brenda must know how much is to be spent on the promotion, as well as the terms and conditions of the promotion.

The sales methods Brenda uses should build trust with the client. The salesperson should exhibit an extensive knowledge of the company’s products and their specifications or capabilities. They should also be able to relate their products with industry standards and show how they rank on dependability and service.

To compete against those with long successful track record, Brenda must do several things. She must study their practices and what made them successful. Brenda must be able to “deliver complete comparative product information in a sales presentation. (Ingram, 2013)” She should understand the strengths and weaknesses which expose vulnerabilities. There may be gaps in technology, service time or delivery expenses. These vulnerabilities must be demonstrated as inferior when compared to Brenda’s products.

How to handle the rumor mill? Brenda should use candor in dealing with the situation. She should be forthcoming and honest with her client. She might want to prepare a statement that addresses each of the rumors. She could then use them to fortify and show examples of how the company excels on that area. She can use the rumors to explain why the company is not ‘in financial trouble’ and dependable for the future. This use can be used to emphasize reliability and trust. That also relates to the rumor about missing delivery deadlines. Brenda may want to produce delivery statements to show that their record is up to the industry standard or exceeds it in any category.

The rumor about the glitch in software will provide Brenda with an opportunity to discuss the superior technology used in her product. She can give a more detailed account into the time and research and history of the product while stressing their ethical standards for maintaining transparency with their clients. Likewise, Brenda can provide service staff records to show that they are not cutting staff. She can also demonstrate how their service department has maintained an outstanding record.

Reference:

Ingram, LaForge, Avila, Schwepker, Williams, SELL, 3rd ed., South-Western, Cengage Learning, 2013

Role Playing Sales Scenario Chapter 1

In role playing scenario 1, Rebecca Stanley advises Wilson to make his own strategy to deal with the Hypermart situation. In the trust-based strategy of selling, the salesperson (SP) strives to build a long-term relationship with the customer. This relationship will be built on generating customer value. In the scenario, Hypermart is interested only in gaining market share not profit. They see all retailers including Biomed itself and its retail website as competition. Wilson’s choice will be in providing customer value for new clients as well as existing ones and the possible conflict which will arise in the future when the Biomed website begins to offer more web-based retail services.

Role-play
Location – Stanley’s office 48 hours later. Wilson discloses his plan to deal with the Hypermart situation.

Stanley: Have you come up with a way to deal with the situation with Hypermart and Ed-Toys?

Wilson: Yes, however, I may need more detailed reports on the market share of existing businesses versus Hypermart ordering capability. Hypermart has the ability to disrupt future sales of the product to other companies. Because of this we will have to choose between selling to them and not selling much to others. Hypermart has a totally self-serving agenda that will discourage other firms from doing business in the market. Already Ed-Toys has voiced objection to them selling at a 20% discount. And Hypermart has voiced objection to our plans to make website friendly retail available to our future customers once the website is done. At this point we may have to determine if an account with Hypermart is worth any new business that may come in later for this product. Unless their impact is more important than any new business they should be dropped as a client. The possibility of generating new clients who will adhere to suggested retail pricing with the advent of the website modifications will generate less channel conflict in the future. It is already evident that Hypermart is trying to utilize a dominant power relationship to force its goals onto the rest of marketing channels. Satisfying this one client will generate continued problems in the future.

Stanley: After I confirm the numbers generated by Hypermart’s purchasing goals, I am sure I will come to agree with your decision. The stability of our market channels is more important the goals of one company.
A manger will want to avoid unfair power relationships that create dependence on one client or channel member. This conflict can be avoided by detaching from the channel which causes the conflict. In this case, it is Hypermart, which is only concerned with its own goals. They have the potential to discourage future clients and dominate too much of the revenue stream for the product. It is wise for Stanley to let Wilson figure this out on his own because it is his presentation of the purchasing terms which will generate the next situation like this. If Wilson doesn’t learn how to spot the channel conflict before it happens, Stanley will constantly have to manage the conflict later on.

If the initial terms required the use of suggested retail pricing for a certain number of months per year or if all retailers are informed of Biomed’s own retail capabilities on the website, this problem can be avoided before the sale. Having a schedule of pricing will help generate confidence in competitors who like Ed-Toys only wanted to know when Hypermart would resume normal pricing. If companies like Hypermart are unwilling to work within a comfortable channel structure for all the members, contracts with them should be discontinued or avoided altogether.

Reference
Ingram, LaForge, Avila, Schwepker, Williams, SELL, 3rd ed., South-Western, Cengage Learning, 2013
Palmatier, Stern, El-Ansary, Marketing Channel Strategy, 8th ed, Pearson, 2015